Homeland Security

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  U.S. Stretched Thin With Terror Combat, Threat Of Cold War IISeptember 14, 1998 20:31 When Russian tanks rolled into Georgia last month, debate broke out about what the United States should do.

But what could the United States do?

Can the U.S. military, so consumed with small wars against terrorists and insurgencies abroad, wage a big war against a sizable adversary?

Those questions are drawing keen attention seven years after the Sept. 11 attacks, time that has seen the United States preoccupied with Iraq and Afghanistan. The Army and Marine Corps are retooling on the fly to fight a war on terror.

Those changes come, some worry, at the expense of the capability for full-blown, army-on-army war.

Meantime, oil wealth has given Russia the cash it needs to rebuild the military power of Soviet days, and China's booming economy makes it a daunting adversary of the future.
  U.S. Stretched Thin With Terror Combat, Threat Of Cold War IISeptember 14, 1998 20:31 When Russian tanks rolled into Georgia last month, debate broke out about what the United States should do.

But what could the United States do?

Can the U.S. military, so consumed with small wars against terrorists and insurgencies abroad, wage a big war against a sizable adversary?

Those questions are drawing keen attention seven years after the Sept. 11 attacks, time that has seen the United States preoccupied with Iraq and Afghanistan. The Army and Marine Corps are retooling on the fly to fight a war on terror.

Those changes come, some worry, at the expense of the capability for full-blown, army-on-army war.

Meantime, oil wealth has given Russia the cash it needs to rebuild the military power of Soviet days, and China's booming economy makes it a daunting adversary of the future.